FAQ on Glassons

Who did the report and why?

The Australian Fashion Report 2015, launched by  international development organisations Baptist World Aid and Not For Sale aims to empower consumers with the knowledge needed to purchase fashion ethically. It was created by Baptist World Aid Australia in the wake of the 2013 Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh - in which 1100 workers lost their lives.

Despite the minimum wage in Bangladesh increasing by 75 per cent since the fatal Rana Plaza collapse in 2013, it still had the lowest minimum wage in the world.

The report also highlighted a lack of transparency, claiming 91 per cent of companies didn't know where all their cotton came from.

"If companies don't know how and where their products are made, then there's no way for them to ensure that their workers are protected," the report's authors stated.

What other companies are in the report?

Although there are signs of progress, the report said many of the worst overall performers were iconic Australian fashion brands including the Just Group (owner of Just Jeans, Jay Jays, Dotti, Peter Alexander and Portmans), fast retail brands like Ally, Valley Girl, Temt and Industrie, and low cost suppliers like Lowes and Best & Less.

"These companies have all received D or F grades.We could find little evidence that any of these fashion retailers were doing much, if anything, to protect workers overseas," the report's authors stated.

"Many of them had little or no publicly available information and/or didn't respond to any of our requests to engage with the research process."

Companies that had made significant improvements included Kmart - which released a complete list of its direct suppliers, the Cotton On Group - which had taken steps to identify suppliers deeper in their supply chain - and H&M, Zara, Country Road and the Sussan Group, which have made efforts to paying better wages for overseas workers, the report said.


Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.